the complete guide to success story marketing

The Small, Big-Impact Piece Missing from Case Studies

Author: ; Published: Sep 9, 2015; Category: Case study writing, customer case studies, Customer success stories; Tags: None; 2 Comments


At age 16, I walked into my small town's local newspaper and asked if I could write for them. The owner had no staff writers, and she agreed to turn me loose on a story.

I wrote about a local business and went on to write about many more. At the time, I regularly studied good writing, in school and in everything I read.

Twenty-six years later, I still write about businesses, now as a case study copywriter. But while I have been working IN writing, I haven't always worked ON my writing.

Daily writing is only part of improving as a writer. You also need conscious effort and external influences - worthy examples and honest peer feedback - to move forward.

It's just in the past couple of years that I have started working on my writing again. I study how news and feature stories are written. I analyze other copywriting. And I'm taking a writing class this fall.

I also took the step of getting feedback on the occasional case study from a seasoned magazine and book author - and my writing immediately improved. How? I learned I was leaving out a big ingredient that would make my writing more interesting: details.

Mental Pics for Readers

Over the past year, I've written 20 or so success stories on copywriters trained by American Writers and Artists, Inc. (AWAI). In showing the evolution of their writing careers, I discovered countless opportunities for detail.

Instead of saying, "She's been writing since she was a child," I learned to say, "She started writing horse stories in her Hello Kitty notebook in third grade."

I could say, "She did odd jobs to make ends meet," or "She organized shoes at Macy's and spun Blizzards at Dairy Queen."

See how detail takes a statement from "telling" to crafting a picture for the reader?

What about Tech Case Studies?

In case studies about technology,  adding detail doesn't mean more technical detail. Leave those in Tech Specs boxes on the website or in data sheets, not within a narrative. Keep a customer case study focused on the customer's experience.

In a tech case study, adding detail looks something like this:

Say this...

“It took marketing teams days or weeks to pull all the data they needed for a campaign.”

Instead of this...

“Marketing teams were slow to get campaigns out the door.”

Say this...

“The school upgraded its entire computer lab for one-third the cost it would have spent on traditional PCs.”

Instead of this...

The school upgraded its computer lab for significantly less cost compared to traditional PCs.”


In a recent case study I wrote for a large B2B company, I included numerous details about the featured customer, a sports stadium:

  • How many people packed the stadium for its biggest-ever event
  • The number of photographers and journalists in attendance
  • How slow Internet previously forced journalists to go inside to transmit their photos and stories
  • How much VIP guests paid for their tickets
  • Who won the game!

It's in the details that stories fully form and remain in readers' minds.

What details can you add to your writing - today?

Dear Vendor: You’re Not Helping Me Buy from You

Author: ; Published: Aug 11, 2015; Category: B2B marketing, Case study writing, customer case studies, Customer success stories, Writing Customer Stories; Tags: None; No Comments


Last month, we did what we never expected: we bought a fixer-upper home – we, who can change a light bulb but do little else.

Only a few square feet have been updated since our home was built nearly 30 years ago. Ideally, we’d land on some reality-TV show where the renovators would swoop in and fix it all lickety-split while we are on vacation.

I’ll call HGTV. But meanwhile, we’re reaching out to multiple vendors and contractors to tackle a wish-list longer than our block. Yet, we’re barely moving forward.

That’s because we’re trying to wade through a sea of potential vendors who can help, most immediately, with floors and doors. We want to buy but distinguishing one vendor from another is tough and time-sapping.

You know what would help? Some juicy customer stories showing how a vendor provided a positive experience for other homeowners.

But website after website show no sign of the customer’s voice. It’s all “we can do this and that for you.”

Sure, we have sites such as Yelp and Angie’s List, but often, those free-form reviews are not answering the primary questions we have.

What’s it like to work with a vendor? Are they responsive? Are they professional? Are they knowledgeable? Do they do quality work?

Don’t Compete on Price

A vendor-produced customer case study gives a business the unique chance to showcase a customer’s positive experience – and answer the most common questions that potential customers have.

This is how a business competes on something other than price.

Every business needs customer case studies, but I know they compete with other budget dollars. Why not make them part of the website plan? Give the customer’s voice real estate on the website just like you’d design every house with a living room.

Because what the customer says about you is way more credible than what you say about yourself.

How Do You Get Started?

1.    Start small - If you’ve never captured the customer’s voice before, start small. Approach three happy customers about being featured. Set realistic goals at the outset, such as creating story-based testimonials or short success stories – maybe just three paragraphs.
2.    Follow the story format – Keep interview questions simple and follow the standard format of covering the challenge (what the customer was trying to solve), solution (how YOU solved it), and results (the positive outcomes of working with the product, service or company).
3.    Get approval – Write your testimonials or customer stories and send them to customers for review, edits and approval.

Now, get going. Help customers buy from you!

Another Idea for Getting No-Go Customers off the Fence

Author: ; Published: Jun 16, 2015; Category: customer case studies, Customer permission for case studies, Customer success stories; Tags: , ; No Comments


It’s been 15 years since I wrote my first case study. And year after year since then, I hear the same challenge  from organizations as the main reason they don’t create more case studies.

"We can't get customers to agree to do them!"

You may be a customer's best, most beloved vendor, but for various reasons, the customer just can't or won't say yes...

•    Larger organizations often have policies against endorsing vendors
•    Some don't want to reveal competitive secrets
•    Others simply don't want to spare the time

The truth is, you have to sell the idea to the customer. With nearly anything – and especially with harried business people – it's still about WIIFM (what's in it for me?).

But you have to know who you're selling to and tailor the benefits accordingly:

1- The company
At the company level, organizations that say yes might be motivated by the positive publicity, a chance to showcase their best practices, the prestige of showing they work with an esteemed brand or hot technology, among others.

2- Individuals
But many case studies move forward because of greater motivations of the individuals involved. Maybe the person who chose the vendor and led the successful project internally wants to showcase his or her professional accomplishments. They want to document that in a case study, speaking opportunity or award entry. Or they might be moved by activities in tandem with a case study such as the chance to network with peers on your customer advisory board.

For both companies and individuals, monetary motivators are questionable. Most references – if not hindered by a corporate policy against participating – are willing to be featured or serve as a reference without monetary incentives.

You want true customer advocates to be featured – not because they get a discount on software or services.

Donate to Their Charity of Choice
But there’s another option that may motivate both companies and individuals. What about appealing to their sense of altruism? How about donating to the company's or individual's charity of choice as a thank-you for sharing their story? The amount may vary based on your budget, but probably set it at at least $25.

I recently met Ryan Sorley of DoubleCheck Research. His company conducts win-loss interviews for organizations. Essentially, he uncovers why an organization chose – or didn't choose – to buy a product or service. Ryan isn’t creating customer case studies, but in gaining the interviews he needs, the challenge is similar; participation is voluntary.

For every interview he does, Ryan makes a donation to the contact's charity of choice. He has many to choose from so individuals can select the one they feel most strongly about. Not every person he contacts says yes, but it does contribute to a pretty high rate of success in getting win-loss interviews.

Customer case studies are similar. A charitable donation on the customer's behalf may not sway the most ardent dissenters but it can possibly get a few off the fence – and appeal to their desire to do good.

Why You Should Never Interview Your Own Customers

Author: ; Published: May 4, 2015; Category: Uncategorized; Tags: None; No Comments


A few years ago, high on the belief in the power of customer success stories, I set out to create some of my own.

I'd already created hundreds of case studies for others, so why wouldn’t I create my own to show the value of working with me?

The "why not?" became immediately apparent when, during phone interviews, I unexpectedly felt uncomfortable asking my own clients about their experiences with me.

Sure, I was inquiring about their positive experiences, but still, it was strange for both of us. And I believe they were less forthcoming with quotes and information than they would have been if I'd partnered with a writer friend to do this for me.

I might as well have said, "Tell me how great I am!" No one likes to be a part of that.

I went on and wrote the case studies, but vowed never to interview my own customers again.

Get Some Distance
Case studies are not objective pieces of journalism. They are clearly produced by a vendor to showcase a positive experience.

But that doesn't mean that you shouldn't engage a neutral party to interview and write your case studies. A third party adds a critical measure of distance between the vendor and the customer, and encourages the customer to open up and share in a way they wouldn't with someone they are closer to.

Many of us are more willing to pay for the chance to tell a therapist more intimate information than we would tell our closest friends.

And in the case of case studies, giving and receiving praise directly makes some of us shift in our seats.

Get Over Hang Ups
I understand why many organizations - and often those closest to the customer – interview their own customers:
1.    They know the customer's background and the solutions being featured.
2.    They want to protect valued relationships.
3.    Third parties cost more than using internal resources.

I get all those reasons, but believe the value that third-party interviews provide outweighs them. Someone else can learn the customer's background and subject matter well enough to interview and write about them. Client relationship "owners" can still sit on customer interviews if they really choose, but customers open up more if they don't. It's just 30-60 minutes of time, and reps can be part of the rest of the process.

It's true that a third party costs more than using internal resources for interviews, but the payoff is usually in more candid interviews. At a minimum, get a marketing contact within the company to conduct interviews – not sales or account reps.

So back away from your customers – at least when it comes to conducting case study interviews!

Arm Your Sales Team with Customer Success Slides

Author: ; Published: Mar 9, 2015; Category: Case studies in the sales process, customer case studies, Customer success stories; Tags: ; No Comments

nervous woman

It's 9 a.m. and your sales rep is preparing for a big meeting with a hot prospect in two hours. The rep is building a PowerPoint with all the key differentiators about your company.

What examples can she share of current customer successes?

Although she's got a good written customer case study that fits the prospect's situation, she needs a slide to represent it.

In most cases, the sales rep has to stop and craft a slide with the key points – and many do. I’ve seen multiple examples of such slides, quickly created by the sales rep.

But slides created individually by reps don’t always follow a consistent format, and they aren’t available as common assets for all reps to use.

Instead, make it easy for your sales reps. Include ready-to-go slides in their toolkit of sales support assets.

Then, they can simply grab a slide that fits the prospect they're approaching.

What to Include
On your summary slide, include...
•    Your branding
•    An engaging, results-oriented headline
•    The featured customer's logo
•    8 to 10 short bullets that cover Challenge, Solution and Results
•    A customer quote, if there's space

Tip: Make this slide creation nearly turnkey by including the same bullets in the sidebar summary that are on the written case study or in the web summary, and then copy and paste them into your slide.

Voila! You have your slide ready for the rep to grab for that 11 a.m. meeting.

Here's an example:

AC-0324-11 Rodale PowerPoint Case Study 6-1-2012